Writer Vs. Author (Poll)

Saw this topic  on a Linkedin discussion forum, and the various answers intrigued me.  What are your thoughts?

I like to open a call for my fellow readers who would like to debate on this particular topic.  State your opinion and back it up, and I will post it on this blog for people to respond.  If you’d like to participate, use the Contact page to send me a message, or simply leave a comment below.

 

 

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5 thoughts on “Writer Vs. Author (Poll)

  1. I don’t think I could send you 750 words…

    My definition of a writer is anyone who performs any literary creating, i.e poetry, fiction, nonfiction, etc.

    I always saw authors as people whose works had been published online or in print, whether that be in literary magazines or their own novels.

    Liked by 1 person

  2. A writer can be a writer without publishing his or her work.

    An author on the other hand is published… whether he or she “authored” a letter to a friend or Congress, or wrote and published a full length book.

    Liked by 1 person

  3. Writer and author are very similar nouns in their common usage, but writer is a broad term that covers anybody who assembles words. Author usually refers to a writer, but one who is identified with their body of work (however large or small). The implication is that what an author writes has visibility beyond their private sphere.

    There are some forms of writing where “author” is not the usual term, such as journalism: one usually refers to the writer of an article, editorial, column or feature rather than the author. With literature “author” is much more common, especially for a creator of prose. With poetry or dramatic works the more specialized “poet”, “playwright”, “dramatist” or “screenwriter” are often used, leaving “author” primarily as the term for novelists.

    Finally, “writer” is descriptive of what the person does. It derives from the verb, from the action (just like the word “scribe”). “Author” in contrast is synonymous with “creator”, hence phrases like “author of one’s own misfortune” to describe someone who has gotten themselves into trouble. While “writer” deals exclusively with the mechanical acts of putting pen to paper (or an equivalent: finger to keyboard), “author” refers to the creative aspect, the invention.

    Liked by 1 person

  4. I am a writer, a blogger, and somewhat of a wordsmith, but I wouldn’t claim the title of “author”. My writings are online and available to all who wish to read them, but none have been “published” as printed-material.

    Steve

    Liked by 1 person

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