“Fan”tastical Friday: Helen Keller


I’ve never really gave much notice to the term “fandom” until I looked up the meaning of the word in a dictionary:

-“the state or condition of being a fan of someone or something.”

This definition made me chuckle as it sounds like something out of a psychology textbook.  So, I looked at what Wikipedia had to say:

-“a term used to refer to a subculture composed of fans characterized by a feeling of empathy and camaraderie with others who share a common interest.”

Meaning, you can be a “fan” of not just individuals or movies or a particular kind of music; but, also of an ideal, an interest, motive, etc..  I think you get the idea.

I suppose now that I’m thinking (oh, so dangerous) I am a fan of multiple things.

For today, I will focus on one of them.

Women with great inner strength.

Helen Keller.  Dr. Elizabeth Blackwell. Mother Teresa. Anne Frank. Maya Angelou.

There are just too many to list here but the one who has been the greatest inspiration to me was Helen Keller.

Although I am legally blind and deaf, I still have enough of both to manage.  But Helen had none of both and she still got around!  There are days when I get frustrated at my shortcomings and limitations to the point I just want to quit and throw in the towel (and I’ve done this before which brought only misery for me),  but I have to remind myself that there are (and have been) others who persevered and thrived despite their disabilities.

Which gives me hope.

And some days, that is all I need to continue on.


“Although the world is full of suffering, it is also full of the overcoming of it.”

-Helen Keller




Iconic Series: Song-“The Wreck of the Edmund Fitzgerald” by Gordon Lightfoot



As a writer, I am also a lover of music and movies.  I will run an Iconic Series featuring various musicians/songs/films that I love, and which ones I deemed as being iconic of the times.  To start off I like to focus on the 1970s and one of the most iconic songs of that decade has to be “The Wreck of the Edmund Fitzgerald.”

It’s a legendary and tragic tale, second most known of all shipwrecks behind the Titanic.  “The Edmund Fitzgerald was lost with her entire crew of 29 men on Lake Superior November 10, 1975, 17 miles north-northwest of Whitefish Point, Michigan.” (Reference taken from the Shipwreck Museum website)    Gordon Lightfoot, a Canadian singer, wrote and performed this ballad which created an even more (world-wide) interest in this iconic ship.


Choose Your Path (Part Two)


“I took the road less traveled by, and that has made all the difference.”- (Robert Frost) The Road Not Taken

The above quote is the one I can relate to the most-at this point in my life.

I’m looking to others who have tread on before me as examples and for inspiration as I struggle to build confidence in myself as a writer; as a scribe who’s on a journey that could be considered spiritual in nature; as a journalist who’s risking much to share painful experiences, and bare thoughts and feelings to those willing to listen.

There will always be those who refuse to accept you for who you are, and for the things you stand for.   These same people will be the first to criticize and ridicule you as a writer, and a person.  And yeah, that hurts…a lot.

These are the times when I’d turn to the creative-minded individuals who’s gone on before me for strength and wisdom; to know that I am not alone in this battle is always a wonderful comfort, and to glean the motivation needed to keep traveling the path I’m on.

Someday, I hope to be strong and courageous enough to branch off, and blaze a new path for others to follow.




Friday Quote

I keep going back to this quote especially in light of everything that has been happening around the world this past year:

“The purpose of a writer is to keep civilization from destroying itself.” -Albert Camus

Good writers are needed now more than ever!  Will you take up the call and get your work out there?

The Past and You (Poll)

Using Pain To Create More Realistic Characters

day eight


As writers, we tend to be more sensitive to various events in life whether in our own lives or in the lives of others; and because of this sensitivity, certain events- specifically those that involve losses- hit writers exceptionally hard.

Why is that so?

Speaking from personal experience, I consider myself an empath and tend to internalize emotions from others around me which at times would threaten to overwhelm me so what do I usually do?  I run from them.  I’ve done it so many times in the past (during the deaths of my maternal grandmother and first husband for examples).   Stifling my own emotions, not allowing them to surface, I believe affected me as a writer especially when it came to developing realistic characters. How can a character be “real” when she’s not allowed to feel?  After all, readers are drawn to these types of characters.  And why is that?

Because readers can relate to them.

So, many of my stories tend to fall short with characters coming across as “flat” or too one-dimensional.   The desire and passion to become the best writer that I can be keep growing within me to the point that it became louder than my own fears of emotions.

I forced myself to face them when my daddy died.  Internally I kept going back and forth with excuses as to why I couldn’t go to the hospital and be with my family on my dad’s final night.  I so wanted to run.  But, I didn’t. Not this time.  It was probably the most difficult thing I ever had to face, watching my daddy take those last agonizing breaths, listening to my mom and siblings weeping next to me.  I thought for sure it would overwhelm me, but it didn’t.  The emotions I felt was a deep sadness as well as gratitude.  I was so grateful that I was there for my daddy, and for my family. I thought for sure that their pain would force me to run; instead, I found myself hugging each one of them.  I even kissed my daddy’s forehead after he had passed as I said my final goodbye.

Now I can tell myself (and other writers) this:  it is okay to be afraid of your emotions, of your pain (or of others’), but don’t run from them.  They have a way of caching up to you.   It is easier to face them head-on, and acknowledge them for what they truly are.  By doing this, it would enable you to write a more fully developed characters that your readers can relate to.



“Many of us spend our whole lives running from feeling with the mistaken belief that you cannot bear the pain.  But you have already borne the pain. What you have not done is feel all you are beyond the pain.”-Saint Bartholomew




Another Writing Poll (In light of Robin Williams’ recent passing)

I think Robin Williams’ recent passing hit most of the people in the creative world quite hard.  On a personal level, it made me examine certain things in my own life in a more serious manner. Hence, this was one of the questions that kept coming to my mind.



Be Honest With Yourself…(Poll)




Your Favorite Author (Poll)

Do you remember who your favorite author was when you were young?  Did he or she inspire you to become a writer?  If so, do you find that you’re writing in the same genre as that author?