Are There Too Many Books Out There?

too many books

I posted a poll to both here and on Twitter to garner how many thought if there were too many writers and not enough readers.  Majority of those who responded (around 74%) believed that there were more than enough readers for all the books now out there.

Okay, let’s delve a bit deeper and look at some of the statistics that I’ve managed to find.

According to one article, in 2013 at least 28 million books were published in English.  It looks like this included both traditional and self-published “print” titles.  The article went on to state that in 2003 the number of books in print were only around one million titles.  Kind of put things in perspective on just how much things have exploded since the early 2000’s.

I pulled up the Worldometers’ site, its clocking the world population at around 7.4 billion.  North America has 360 million, Europe at 738 million, Africa 1.2 billion; but Asia takes the crown at well over 4.4 billion.

Of the 7.4 billion, nearly 1 billion are illiterate.

Another sobering number to look at is that at least 3 billion of the world population lives in poverty; many of these may not have access to books because of the condition they live in.

This still leaves a good chunk of people as readers, right?

How many of the remaining population actually spends the time reading books in all honesty?  With people working more hours each week, and with various technology distractions, the number of people reading seems to be on the decline.

It seems that the challenge facing writers these days is trying to get people to read their work.  With so many published titles out there (and mind you, these numbers do not include digital ones), how does a writer go about doing that?

Any thoughts?

 

 

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Your Favorite Author (Poll)

Do you remember who your favorite author was when you were young?  Did he or she inspire you to become a writer?  If so, do you find that you’re writing in the same genre as that author?

 

 

Why You’re Not A Successful Writer (Yet)

Note: I posted this on my other blog, Artistic Crossroads on 2/5/14.  Enjoy!

 

There are many writers out there who are feeling discouraged.  Why can’t their work be recognized by others?  No one’s buying or reading; or, they have only a few buyers/readers.  Rejection after rejection keeps hitting the email box.  What are they doing wrong?  What aren’t they doing right?

Realistically, you can’t (although it does happen) expect fame/stardom over-night or instant recognition for a work well-done.  Like Rowling or King, success didn’t just come.  It took several years.  Hundreds of rejections.  Eventually, it came to pass.  For these two, they made millions (both in dollars and in fans); but for the rest of us, success comes in various sizes.

So, why aren’t you successful?   Hmm…success means different things to each writer.  It could mean selling 1,000 copies of your memoir.  It could mean earning more than $3,000 each month through various copywriting projects.  For another, it could mean having thousands of followers/subscribers on a blog.

Here are some general reasons that I’ve come up with (feel free to add your input!):

1. Your craft/niche may not be developed enough. Write. Write.  And, then write some more. Learn what your weaknesses and strengths are, and how to play them up or down.  Find your voice.  This will set you a-part from the others.

2. People may not know you’re out there.  Start a blog and write about the things you’re passionate about.  Check out other writers’ blogs and web sites, and comment on their posts/articles.  Many of them will return the favor.  Seek out guest blogging and interview opportunities.  In a nutshell, this is called networking.  Marketing.  The more you put yourself out there, the more people will take notice.

3. The world isn’t ready for you (yet).

4. You may need to start at the “bottom” and work your way “up.”   You have a science-fiction novel that you love to have published, but no one and I mean no one is looking at you or your manuscript.  So, you really enjoy writing science fiction.  Try writing a few short stories in this genre, and then find small magazines/ezines to publish them. Get your name out there with a few minor publishing credits.  This will help improve your credibility as a serious writer.

I’m sure there are many other reasons, but these are probably some of the major ones.